Are you considering a job change after the holidays? Then answer these four questions.

Hope everyone had a relaxing holiday at the summer house, on a terrace or at a beach of a foreign destination. It is nice to relax in a good company and get work-related things out of your mind for a while. However, as the end of the holidays approach, many people start to have an unfortunate feeling in the back of their heads:

“I don’t want to go back to work after the holidays. There’s not a nice atmosphere there… ”

“The new boss doesn’t mind me … what should I do about it?”

“Hmm.. Should I look for something new to get excited about work again? … ”

If returning to the same job feels like an unfortunate or even disgusting idea, it is good to think about alternatives. For example, the following four questions can help you start exploring a new job or career:

1. What do you want to do and achieve in your work?

There is no point to think about positions based on job titles, but on the daily activities and achievements your position constructs of. Good position allows you to use your strengths regularly and, at best, minimize activities you don’t like or tend to do. A number of studies have also shown that work that produces strong flow feeling (at least 20% of the time), reduces the risk of burnout significantly. What position could offer you that?

2. What do you want to learn, where do you want to develop?

100% of future jobs will require continuous learning and development. For many of us, development and growth at work are important factors in making choices between different jobs. What do you want to learn in particular? In what job are there good opportunities for this?

3. What motivates and interests you?

To enjoy your work, it is important to experience meaning. Also, it is not a disadvantage if you are interested in the field or even enthusiastic about what you are promoting. However, the things mentioned before are not the only motivational factors. It is important to identify your own motivational factors at work, and they might change over time. Are you motivated by the same things as you did 5, 10 or 15 years ago? What motivates you now?

4. What kind of team and culture do you want to work in?

Not many jobs are done alone and the smallest unit performing is often a team. What kind of team members do you want to work with? What kind of leadership is right for you? Is the customer interface your thing? What kind of organization and culture do you perform well or even excel at? Do you need clear structures and processes or for example an entrepreneurial culture? What values does a company need to show in its daily operations to align with your own values? Equally: where do you not belong?

If the compatibility between you and your job is not sufficient in these factors, you are unlikely to do well or enjoy it for very long. If the compatibility of these factors is good for you and your job, then you have the opportunity to create your so called dream job. It is also good to remember that changing jobs is not the only solution; alternatively, you may want to modify the content of your current job, study a new profession, or even become an entrepreneur.

What do You want to do next in your career?

Writer: Antero Ojanaho, Senior Consultant / Mazhr Oy (transl. Venla Tulppala)